“We could not give Cantillon away,” says Engert, now the beverage director of D.C.’s extensive Neighborhood Restaurant Group, including the influential ChurchKey. “Our back cellar was just overwrought with Cantillon bottles, and not just 375 milliliter bottles of Gueuze. There was Fou’Foune, all sorts of Lou Pepe, different vintages—people just didn’t want it.”

Source: America Gone Wild — How an Ancient Tradition Became the New Wave in U.S. Brewing — Good Beer Hunting

America Gone Wild — How an Ancient Tradition Became the New Wave in U.S. Brewing — Good Beer Hunting

For some people, beer is the perfect end to a workday. For Bertha Jimenez, it’s the start of a new way to eliminate food waste.

Breweries throw out millions of pounds of used grain every day that could have other uses. While some is repurposed as animal feed, compostable products or heating fuel, little has been exploited for its value as food.

But Ms. Jimenez, 35, has created a small start-up, Rise Products, that converts the grain into a flour that is finding its way into sustainable bakeries and kitche

Source: From Brewery to Bakery: A Flour That Fights Waste – The New York Times

From Brewery to Bakery: A Flour That Fights Waste – The New York Times

“The government issued posters and pamphlets saying wine from hybrids contained excess quantities of methyl alcohol, which was ‘proven to cause madness,’” says Borel. “Of course, the claims had no scientific basis, but it took decades for that to be proven.”

Source: The Rebellious French Village Making Wine Banned by the E.U. – Gastro Obscura

The Rebellious French Village Making Wine Banned by the E.U. – Gastro Obscura

Port might be said to be literally the ultimate sleeping draught. In northern Portugal there are presumably some people who drink port in the middle of the day, but for most of us, if we drink port at all, it is a post-prandial treat, the last thing to pass our lips before late-night toothpaste. Yet the sad thing is that too many wine drinkers – even wine drinkers open to every sort of exotic combination of provenance and grape variety – see port as too strong and/or too sweet for them.

This is such a shame because the quality of port being made today is higher than it has ever been, and the range of different styles of port that are reasonably easy to find outside Portugal is so much wider than it was.

Source: Port – the perfect nightcap | Articles | JancisRobinson.com

Port – the perfect nightcap | Articles | JancisRobinson.com

You may know it from Tupac, Key & Peele, or Dr. Evil, but “pouring one out” is a lot older than you might think. It’s actually straight-up ancient.

Just a quick refresher for the uninitiated: pouring one out refers to “the act of pouring liquid (usually an alcoholic beverage) on the ground as a sign of reverence for friends or relatives that have passed away. In most cases, a 40 ounce bottle (see: forty) of liquor is used.” That’s Urban Dictionary’s definition. Funny thing is, it isn’t much different from

Source: Libations And The Ancient History Of Pouring One Out | VinePair

Libations And The Ancient History Of Pouring One Out | VinePair

With names like Shastafarian Porter, Joint Effort Hemp Ale and Fresh Bongwater Pale Ale, craft breweries’ affinity for weed is unabashed and long-established.

https://www.playboy.com/read/the-cannabis-industry-should-take-cues-from-what-s-on-tap

Could the Cannabis Industry Outsmart Craft Brewers?

The expectations of how a wine from a certain region should taste go back hundreds of years, but the global industry that has been built atop them is largely a product of the past century. If natural wine is a backlash against anything, it is the idea that it is possible to square traditional methods of winemaking with the scale and demands of that market. There is a sense that alongside economic success, globalisation has slowly forced the wine world toward a dull, crowd-pleasing conformity.

Continue reading: https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/may/15/has-wine-gone-bad-organic-biodynamic-natural-wine

Has wine gone bad? |The Gaurdian

The team sampled 12 brands of beer from large brewers and craft brewers from around the Great Lakes. In every sample microscopic plastic fibers and particles were detected. Most of the fibers were smaller than five millimeters in length.

Wattenberg said what was interesting about the beer samples was a discrepancy in the amount of plastic contained in the final product when compared with the water used to make it.

https://www.wpr.org/minnesota-researchers-find-microplastics-beer-made-great-lakes-water

Micro plastics in your beer?

United States of beer

The United States of Beer

Randall Grahm’s iconoclastic obsession will involve breeding new varietals from scratch and growing them where grapes have never been grown before.

A conversation with Randall Grahm