You may know it from Tupac, Key & Peele, or Dr. Evil, but “pouring one out” is a lot older than you might think. It’s actually straight-up ancient.

Just a quick refresher for the uninitiated: pouring one out refers to “the act of pouring liquid (usually an alcoholic beverage) on the ground as a sign of reverence for friends or relatives that have passed away. In most cases, a 40 ounce bottle (see: forty) of liquor is used.” That’s Urban Dictionary’s definition. Funny thing is, it isn’t much different from

Source: Libations And The Ancient History Of Pouring One Out | VinePair

Libations And The Ancient History Of Pouring One Out | VinePair

With names like Shastafarian Porter, Joint Effort Hemp Ale and Fresh Bongwater Pale Ale, craft breweries’ affinity for weed is unabashed and long-established.

https://www.playboy.com/read/the-cannabis-industry-should-take-cues-from-what-s-on-tap

Could the Cannabis Industry Outsmart Craft Brewers?

The expectations of how a wine from a certain region should taste go back hundreds of years, but the global industry that has been built atop them is largely a product of the past century. If natural wine is a backlash against anything, it is the idea that it is possible to square traditional methods of winemaking with the scale and demands of that market. There is a sense that alongside economic success, globalisation has slowly forced the wine world toward a dull, crowd-pleasing conformity.

Continue reading: https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/may/15/has-wine-gone-bad-organic-biodynamic-natural-wine

Has wine gone bad? |The Gaurdian

The team sampled 12 brands of beer from large brewers and craft brewers from around the Great Lakes. In every sample microscopic plastic fibers and particles were detected. Most of the fibers were smaller than five millimeters in length.

Wattenberg said what was interesting about the beer samples was a discrepancy in the amount of plastic contained in the final product when compared with the water used to make it.

https://www.wpr.org/minnesota-researchers-find-microplastics-beer-made-great-lakes-water

Micro plastics in your beer?

United States of beer

The United States of Beer

Randall Grahm’s iconoclastic obsession will involve breeding new varietals from scratch and growing them where grapes have never been grown before.

A conversation with Randall Grahm

Largely out of curiosity, the spirits panel recently tasted through 20 bottles of blended Scotch in an effort to see what they offered. For the tasting, Florence Fabricant and I were joined by two drinks writers, David Wondrich and Robert Simonson. First, some definitions. All Scotch whisky must be made in Scotland. Single malts come from a single distillery and are distilled entirely from malted barley. Malting simply means soaking the barley until it germinates, which releases enzymes that convert starch

Source: Does Blended Scotch Still Have a Place in the Modern Bar? – The New York Times

Does Blended Scotch Still Have a Place in the Modern Bar? – The New York Times

Grape or grain, but never the twain,” goes the old saying, but brewers no longer seem to care. In a craft-beer world where no ingredient is off the menu – even really disgusting ones such as beard yeast or peanut butter – grapes have become an increasingly common addition to the brewing process.

Source: Brewing on the vine: four beer/wine hybrids to seek out | Life and style | The Guardian

Brewing on the vine: four beer/wine hybrids to seek out | Life and style | The Guardian

In the late 1880s, we also see the arrival of the Bijou, an almost Martini-like drink made of gin, sweet vermouth and Chartreuse, and featuring one of the first olive garnishes. By 1895, the Turf Cocktail appears in George J. Kappeler’s Modern American Drinks. It merely asked for the three ingredients: Old Tom Gin, Angostura and orange bitters

Source: The Evolution of the Martini from Sweet to Dry | PUNCH

The Evolution of the Martini from Sweet to Dry | PUNCH

It is very common to see everyday farmers in well known tea regions growing tea simply for their own supply, with small well tended plots. Often they will grow tiny amounts each year, just enough for themselves and their family and friends. If and when they do produce too much, often they are forced to simply sell it to Japans Agriculture Ministry at a low fixed price. This at least provides a subsidised basic income for that crop, and the tea eventually makes its way into mass blended tea described above. This can make it a challenge to find small scale growers who are happy to sell their precious tea. A challenge we were very happy to take on and it was with this in mind that we visited our favourite tea regions on the island of Kyushu, to procure some wonderful single origin teas direct from small scale farmers.

Source: Japan Tea Sourcing Trip | Tip Top Tea’s online tea store blog

Japan Tea Sourcing Trip | Tip Top Tea’s online tea store blog